established social hierarchies

This project calls to my mind the book The Help.  Looking at these photos, I feel as though I know who are the respective givers and receivers of “help” just about as easily I would the characters in that book of Kathryn Stockett’s that I love so much.

WOMEN AND THEIR MAIDS: A PHOTOGRAPHIC LEVELLING

VIA

An interesting photo project, called Lugar Común (Common Place), designed to disrupt our acceptance of established social hierarchies. The photographers, Justine Graham and Ruby Rumié, took pictures of 50 pairs of women — maids and their employers — located in Argentina, Chile, and Colombia.To disrupt the hierarchy inherent in their relationship, Graham and Rumié had them dressed alike, without accessories, and sitting in identical poses.   By doing so, they allowed both women to “…look at the camera with the same pride, with the same openness”.  The viewer is not told which woman is which. They also asked each pair to sit across from one another and look in each others’ eyes. Even though some had known each other for 30 years or more, Graham said that all of the pairs had trouble looking at each other in this way. from

An interesting photo project, called Lugar Común (Common Place), designed to disrupt our acceptance of established social hierarchies. The photographers, Justine Graham and Ruby Rumié, took pictures of 50 pairs of women — maids and their employers — located in Argentina, Chile, and Colombia.

To disrupt the hierarchy inherent in their relationship, Graham and Rumié had them dressed alike, without accessories, and sitting in identical poses.   By doing so, they allowed both women to “…look at the camera with the same pride, with the same openness”.  The viewer is not told which woman is which.

They also asked each pair to sit across from one another and look in each others’ eyes. Even though some had known each other for 30 years or more, Graham said that all of the pairs had trouble looking at each other in this way.

two of my favorite things in one

El Ateneo: Library In A Theatre

Buenos Aires, Argentina

elateneo7

elateneo3

elateneo1

“Everyone of us is losing something precious to us. Lost opportunities, lost possibilities, feelings we can never get back again. That’s part of what it means to be alive. But inside our heads—at least that’s where I imagine it—there’s a little room where we store those memories. A room like the stacks in this library. And to understand the workings of our own heart we have to keep on making new reference cards. We have to dust things off every once in a while, let in fresh air, change the water in the flower vases. In other words, you’ll live forever in your own little private library.”— Haruki Murakami