centenarians

A couple of days ago I found the (written) interviews with centenarians on one of my favorite blogs (which wordpress refuses to let me link to right now, but on my blogroll it’s lickystickypickyme.) I was intrigued, so I dug around the interweb for some more interesting 100-plus-year-olds and came up with the videos.  I just love them.

Touching interviews with centenarians, about their look on their long lives:(clockwise)   Alice Herz-Sommer, 108 I survived the concentration camps, and this is something extraordinary.  Thousands and millions that had to die, and we are sitting here. When  we are old, we are aware of the beauty of life. Young people take  everything for granted. It all depends on the character you’re born  with.  Everything I forget. Even if I write it down, I forget to  look. I had an excellent memory and now, I’m an idiot! [Laughs] What do  I do against it? I learn Bach by heart and play the piano. My son died  aged 64. He was a gifted musician, and a wonderful son. My only child.   Nellie Wright, 103 I don’t get by, I exist from one day to the other. I’m hoping for the  end to come. I’m tired of it. Why should it be like this? Not a penny in  my purse! I’ve worked 74 years. Why am I here? I’m waiting for God to straighten this out. I should be  home! My husband died while I was in here. I never even got to his  funeral. It doesn’t matter. I’ve been a decent girl, never drunk or gone  with men. I’ve just lived and worked like a silly fool.   Helen Turner, 101 I’m going to live to 120! I had a party and champagne at 100. Actually, I can’t remember much of it, as I’d had a lot to drink. I was engaged once, but I never met… well, I knew what I was looking  for and I found it, but too late. He’s a professor. Of course he’s  married. And I can’t imagine he’s the sort of person to go off the  rails. Not that I wouldn’t want him to. I’m not saying I’m that good!   Nora Hardwick, 105 It’s in the genes, I suppose. My mother was 94 and my eldest sister was  96. Granny was 97. I’ve kept my brain active. I read and do crosswords.  And I have a little shot of whisky at bedtime. I think that helps.  If it wasn’t for my daughters, I’d have to have somebody in every day,  but, you see, Maureen has showered me today and Jan’s washed my hair.  They keep me clean, that’s the main thing. I’ve treated myself to a  little scooter that I can get out on, in the fresh air. I don’t like  sitting all day. I take every day as it comes. Each one is a bonus.

Touching interviews with centenarians, about their look on their long lives:
(clockwise)

  1. Alice Herz-Sommer, 108
    I survived the concentration camps, and this is something extraordinary. Thousands and millions that had to die, and we are sitting here. When we are old, we are aware of the beauty of life. Young people take everything for granted. It all depends on the character you’re born with.
    Everything I forget. Even if I write it down, I forget to look. I had an excellent memory and now, I’m an idiot! [Laughs] What do I do against it? I learn Bach by heart and play the piano. My son died aged 64. He was a gifted musician, and a wonderful son. My only child.
  2. Nellie Wright, 103
    I don’t get by, I exist from one day to the other. I’m hoping for the end to come. I’m tired of it. Why should it be like this? Not a penny in my purse! I’ve worked 74 years.
    Why am I here? I’m waiting for God to straighten this out. I should be home! My husband died while I was in here. I never even got to his funeral. It doesn’t matter. I’ve been a decent girl, never drunk or gone with men. I’ve just lived and worked like a silly fool.
  3. Helen Turner, 101
    I’m going to live to 120! I had a party and champagne at 100. Actually, I can’t remember much of it, as I’d had a lot to drink.
    I was engaged once, but I never met… well, I knew what I was looking for and I found it, but too late. He’s a professor. Of course he’s married. And I can’t imagine he’s the sort of person to go off the rails. Not that I wouldn’t want him to. I’m not saying I’m that good!
  4. Nora Hardwick, 105
    It’s in the genes, I suppose. My mother was 94 and my eldest sister was 96. Granny was 97. I’ve kept my brain active. I read and do crosswords. And I have a little shot of whisky at bedtime. I think that helps.
    If it wasn’t for my daughters, I’d have to have somebody in every day, but, you see, Maureen has showered me today and Jan’s washed my hair. They keep me clean, that’s the main thing. I’ve treated myself to a little scooter that I can get out on, in the fresh air. I don’t like sitting all day. I take every day as it comes. Each one is a bonus.

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